Catalyzing Knowledge in Dangerous Times
Center for Race & Gender Ten Year Anniversary Conference

Thursday, April 14, 2011
9:30 am – 5:00 pm
370 Dwinelle Hall, UC Berkeley

Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=196570460375105
Getting to 370 Dwinelle Hall:
http://wiki.fluidproject.org/display/fluid/Directions+to+Dwinelle+Hall

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Keynote Lecture:

From Academic Freedom to Academic Abolitionism

Prof. Andrea Smith, UC Riverside

5:30 pm: Reception
6:00 pm – 8:00 pm: Lecture
370 Dwinelle Hall, UC Berkeley

Catalyzing Knowledge in Dangerous Times will explore the ways in which knowledge is politicized, embodied, and imagined within a volatile political climate that targets education as a racialized and gendered battleground for defining legitimacy, visibility, and access.

Conference participants will interrogate the meaning and practice of scholarship in a time shaped by militarism, economic crisis, gender policing, and persistent racism.  They will consider methodologies used inside and outside of academia to challenge what and who is known and identify transformative possiblities stemming from the transgression of traditional epistemological boundaries, academic discipline, gender, and nation.

Schedule:

9:30 am

Center for Race & Gender at Ten Years
Prof. Evelyn Nakano Glenn, Center for Race & Gender
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10:00 am

Media, Maps, & Motion
Moderated by Margaret Rhee, UC Berkeley

Speakers will map the ways in which widely-used technologies can transmit information related to survival strategies across geographic boundaries while subverting policed pathways of communication.

Reels of Resistance: Film IS Social Justice Activism for LGBTQ Communities of Color
Madeleine Lim & Kebo Drew, Queer Women of Color Media Arts Project

net.walkingtools.Transformer.shift()
Micha Cardenas, UC San Diego

A Tale to Two and Half Investigation: Measuring Institutional Insecurities and Contestational Knowledge
Professor Ricardo Dominguez, UC San Diego

“Like Seeds”: A Cosmic Ecology of Black Feminist Education as Transformation
Dr. Alexis Pauline Gumbs, Eternal Summer of the Black Feminist Mind as a project of BrokenBeautiful Press and the co-creator of the Mobilehomecoming Project

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11:30 am

Women of Color Feminist Knowledge
Moderated by Prof. Paola Bacchetta, UC Berkeley

Speakers will explore the race and gender politics of accessing, teaching, and transforming knowledge.

Looking for Resistance in all the Right Places: Centering LGBTQ Youth Testimony in Times of Crisis
Prof. Cindy Cruz, UC Santa Cruz

Imperial Pedagogies: Imagining Internationalist/Feminist/Antiracist Literacies
Prof. Piya Chatterjee, UC Riverside

Pedagogy, Performance, and the Decolonial
Prof. Laura Perez, UC Berkeley

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 12:50 pmLUNCH PROVIDED

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1:40 pm

Educators Organizing Across Borders
Moderated by Erica Boas, UC Berkeley

Presenters will discuss the legacy, perils, and promise of educators organizing across prison borders and colonial projects.

Activist Scholars and the Antiprison Movement
Prof. Julia Oparah (formerly Sudbury), Mills College

Reimagining HIV/AIDS Prevention Education Within A Jail System
Isela González, MPA and Allyse Gray, Forensic AIDS Project

Academic Freedom, or Academic Responsibility? Agency within the Brain of the Monster
Prof. Nada Elia, Antioch University

Administering Palestine on Campus and Constructed “Check-Points.”
Dr. Hatem Bazian, UC Berkeley

~~~

3:00 pm

Sparking, Defending, and Envisioning Ethnic Studies at UC Berkeley
Moderated by Prof. Harvey Dong, UC Berkeley

Presenters will explore the inception and political imagination of Ethnic Studies at UC Berkeley.

Ethnic Studies at Forty: Scholarship, Art, and Activism in the Formation of a Transdisciplinary Field
Prof. Nelson Maldonado-Torres, UC Berkeley/Rutgers University

Staging Hunger, Embodying Pain: Some Queer Thoughts on Campus Organizing
Prof. Sara Kaplan, UC San Diego

*Tokenized, Romanticized, and Professionalized*: Establishing the Significance and Urgency of Decolonizing the University
Ruben Elias Canedo Sanchez, UC Berkeley

From 1969 to the Present: A Brief History Outlining the Critical Role of Women of Color in the Struggle for Ethnic Studies
Ziza Delgado, UC Berkeley

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4:30 pm

Conference Synthesis

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5:30 pm

Reception

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6:00 pm

Keynote Talk:
From Academic Freedom To Academic Abolition
Prof. Andrea Smith, UC Riverside

Featuring poets & performers, Luna Maia, OLO, Jezebel Delilah X, & Maya Chinchilla

PLUS an exhibit of Ethnic Studies political art by
Favianna Rodriguez, Jesus Barraza, & Natalia Garcia Pasmanick,
curated by Elisa Diana Huerta, Multicultural Community Center, UC Berkeley

Made possible by the generous support of the Multicultural Community Center, Department of Ethnic Studies, Native American Studies,African American Studies, Center for New Racial Studies, Center for the Study of Sexual Cultures, Townsend Center for the Humanities, Gender & Women’s Studies Department, Center for the Study of Social Change, Berkeley Center for New Media, Mixed Blood: A Literary Journal, Department of Rhetoric, the Haas Diversity Research Center, the Cal Corps Public Service Center, American Cultures Engaged Scholarship, Berkeley La Raza Law Journal, and the Women of Color Initiative

 

ABSTRACTS:
Media, Maps, & Motion

“Like Seeds”: A Cosmic Ecology of Black Feminist Education as Transformation
Dr. Alexis Pauline Gumbs, Eternal Summer of the Black Feminist Mind as a project of BrokenBeautiful Press and the co-creator of the Mobilehomecoming Project

“New energies of darkness/we disturbed a continent/like seeds.”
-June Jordan “Who Look at Me” (1969)

In Living for the Revolution, historian Kimberly Springer notes that by 1981 all of the explicitly black feminist political organizations in the US were defunct. For a black feminist born in 1982, the practice of black feminism in the 21st century requires time travel, a radical redefinition of space, an intentional and ritualized relationship to memory, death, distance and spirit.  Informed by Katherine McKittrick’s analysis of the spaces black women inhabit as “demonic grounds” haunted and transformed by the impact of racism and sexism on social space, this presentation elaborates on two time traveling, space-making projects the Eternal Summer of the Black Feminist Mind (a multimediated black feminist community school based in Durham, NC with participants around the planet see: blackfeministmind.wordpress.com) and the Queer Black Mobilehomecoming Project (an experiential archive project instigated by two queer black womyn travelling the US in a 1988 Winnebago see: mobilehomecoming.org) as examples of an ecological approach to black feminist dispersal, growth, disruption and impact.

A Tale to Two and Half Investigation: Measuring Institutional Insecurities and Contestational Knowledge
Professor Ricardo Dominguez, UC San Diego

Between January 11th, 2010 and November 10th, 2010 Electronic Disturbance Theater 2.0 and b.a.n.g. lab, two collaborative artivist research groups based at CALIT2/UCSD (a transdisciplinary institute), and Professor Ricardo Dominguez one of the co-founders of both projects found themselves under two and half investigation over their work on Transborder Immigrant Tool, their Electronic Civil Disobedience (ECD) performances against UCOP on March 4th,2010 by both UCSD and UCOP administrations. Professor Dominguez was also under investigation by FBI Cyberdivision for potential federal violations for the ECD artivist gesture in solidarity with statewide actions on against the student fee hikes across the UC system. What can learn about the state of artivist practices and research within the UC system and its response to contestational knowledge?

net.walkingtools.Transformer.shift()
Micha Cardenas, UC San Diego

The Transborder Immigrant Tool is a polyvalent,  polygendered, collectively created project, a multiplicity. On one  level, it is a J2ME java based application that allows users to access the GPS receiver function of a cheap cell phone without having service.  On another level, it is an attempt to create an augmented geography, placing a transreal layer of information over the treacherous desert terrain of the US/Mexico border. Our collective imagines the phone as a biopolitical gesture, an experiment in Science of the Oppressed, a form of poetic sustenance and a media virus. In this lecture/performance I will discuss how the TBT conjures spirits of mayan and queer technologies, as well as fears and realities of technology’s ability to disturb borders: national, gender, genre, disciplinary, fiction/non.

Reels of Resistance: Film IS Social Justice Activism for LGBTQ Communities of Color
Madeleine Lim & Kebo Drew, Queer Women of Color Media Arts Project

Weaving galvanizing films with history, QWOCMAP illustrates the ways in which art has always been a source of cultural resistance and cultural renewal for communities of color, especially LGBTQ people of color.

Art has often been the only voice that marginalized communities have had to declare their humanity. Artists have documented, shaped, defined and informed movements for change, and queers artists on the cutting edge of the LGBTQ movement are one of the keys to liberation.  From Ghost Dancers to revolutionary Mexican corridos to Civil Rights era SNCC Freedom Singers to queers of color filmmakers like Marlon Riggs and Pratibha Parmar, QWOCMAP show that art IS activism.

Women of Color Feminist Knowledge

Looking for Resistance in all the Right Places: Centering LGBTQ Youth Testimony in Times of Crisis
Prof. Cindy Cruz, UC Santa Cruz

Recalling Renato Rosaldo’s “The observer is neither innocent nor omniscient,” this narrative reflects
on my personal experiences compiling testimonios from a street ethnography with LGBTQ homeless youth. My work as a teacher with LGBTQ youth and my role as queer ethnographer forces a repositioning of method and pedagogy, a process of reflecting on power, space, and resistance in the classroom. Testimonio, as a storytelling genre for the dispossessed, the migrant, and the queer, offers a way of collecting and compiling narrative that makes complicit both the role of a researcher and of the subject. It is an acknowledgement of the constructiveness of personal narrative and life history and of how science, as defined by David Stoll (1999) as “hypothesis, evidence, and generalization,” implicitly positions itself in studies of the “subaltern” as a colonial project. My own attempts at reflexivity position my own testimonies in this research, not as anthropological imperialist or collaborator with power, but as “faithful witness.” It is the recognition that the production of knowledge in anthropology and education is an ideological project and despite the objections of Stoll (1999), the choice of testimonio as a methodology forces a reinvention and a radical repositioning of power for both researcher and subject.

Imperial Pedagogies: Imagining Internationalist/Feminist/Antiracist Literacies
Prof. Piya Chatterjee, UC Riverside

What does it mean to teach about women, gender and US imperialism in the “Inland Empire” of southern California, in a public university? How does a teacher “make meaningful”  women’s worlds  that are disconnected from the immediacy of US-based categories and politics?  In this paper, I explore how the classroom arena can become a pedagogical minefield especially if  a teacher is invested in calling out a collective and individual politics of location within the center of empire. I examine these geo-political, national and ethno-racial  tensions “of location”  by thinking about literacy in a broad sense. I parse this question by sharing stories of classrooms here (in the university) and there (in rural India.) I ask whether through our critiques, and our dialectical imagination and practice, we can imagine anti-imperialist pedagogies of connection and possibility.

Educators Organizing Across Borders

Activist Scholars and the Antiprison Movement
Prof. Julia Oparah (formerly Sudbury), Mills College

Activist scholars have played an important role in analyzing and struggling against the “prison-industrial complex” – a conglomeration of state surveillance/punishment machinery and corporate profit-making that has emerged as a response to the rising numbers of “refugees” displaced by the global economy and U.S. militarism worldwide. However, we have often overlooked the symbiotic relationship that exists between the academy and the prison-industrial complex and have therefore been slow to identify the ways we may also be profiting from mass incarceration. This presentation explores possibilities for activist scholarship to challenge the academy’s increasing complicity with penal expansion. I argue that activist scholars need to pay greater attention to the complexities and complicities posed by the rise of the “academic-prison industrial complex”. Weaving personal anecdote with critical analysis, I reflect on the challenges of producing counter-carceral scholarship and provide examples developed by activist scholars. My discussion pays particular attention to the social relations of prison research and calls on scholars to challenge the power inequalities among themselves, community activists, and people in prison.

Reimagining HIV/AIDS Prevention Education Within A Jail System
Isela González, MPA and Allyse Gray, Forensic AIDS Project

The Forensic AIDS Project, an HIV prevention and care service provider, has served adults incarcerated in the SF county jails for over 25 years.  During the past decade we have emphasized and expanded our efforts to improve HIV prevention services to incarcerated women of color by establishing a community based participatory action research collaboration with Dr. Jessica Fields of the San Francisco State University’s Center for Research on Gender and Sexuality.  In 2004 the Reach Inward for Self Empowerment (RISE) Project established a foundation of core values: trust, respect and honoring the life experiences of imprisoned women of color.  Our work builds on the notion that they are the experts in their lives and together we can share, learn and expand our knowledge, approach and services to promote healthier lives and communities.  Our current new media project “From the Center” centers incarcerated women’s voices by supporting them in creating their own digital stories, a tool that utilizes still images, simple technology with a specific focus on the personal narrative.  Our hope is that by empowering incarcerated women of color and providing opportunities for them to have a voice, which is oftentimes silenced in the larger discourse, we can expand the notions of education, knowledge and community.

Academic Freedom, or Academic Responsibility? Agency within the Brain of the Monster
Prof. Nada Elia, Antioch University

As political events evolve around the world, area scholars are called upon to provide expert analysis about various developments.  This expertise is understood as the capacity to better understand the socio-political context, grasp its complexities, explain them, and even make highly educated guesses about possible outcomes. The assumption is that scholars have no agency in actually making and shaping the events, they merely observe and interpret them.  Elia argues that academics do shape the events they observe, analyze, and comment on. That is, scholars are truly knowledge producers, not merely interpreters.  And while some scholarship, under certain circumstances, can theoretically be “neutral,” the political reality is such that, the more militarized a society, the less likely it is that its academy functions in a bubble, an Ivory Tower.  Indeed, the more militarized a society, the more complicit its academy.  Academic freedom, then, means freedom to resist complicity with the oppressive state.  In Palestine, this translates into the boycott of institutions that research and develop the tools of occupation and apartheid.

Sparking, Defending, and Envisioning Ethnic Studies at UC Berkeley

*Tokenized, Romanticized, and Professionalized*: Establishing the Significance and Urgency of Decolonizing the University
Ruben Elias Canedo Sanchez, UC Berkeley

For this dialogue, I will combine: (a) Zeus Leonardo’s work on the neo-abolition of whiteness, (b) Gloria Anzaldua’s mestiza consciousness, (c) statistics on the representation of students of color, first-generation, and low-income students at UC Berkeley from 1996 to present, and (d) my experiences in Student Initiated Spaces and Student Support Services.  Furthermore, I will critique current re-constructionist neo-liberal efforts, that are utilizing the banner of “diversity.” I will present how they have negative disproportionate effects on the spaces of underrepresented communities at UC Berkeley. By the end of this presentation, I hope to provide enough questions, alternative critical analyses, and arguments to establish the significance and urgency that decolonizing institutions of higher education through theory, pedagogy, and praxis has.

Staging Hunger, Embodying Pain: Some Queer Thoughts on Campus Organizing
Prof. Sara Kaplan, UC San Diego

This presentation revisits the 1999 student strike for Ethnic Studies at UC Berkeley in the context of the widespread student-of-color protests at UC San Diego last February. This juxtaposition of two campus-based struggles around race, gender, and knowledge production serves as the point of entry for a queer reflection on campus organizing—that is, one that looks askance, rather than backwards. How might understanding such campaigns as the performance of a collective radical ‘kinesthetic imagination’ allow us to reconceive of political protest as something that, like performance itself, represents, but does not reproduce? What truisms of campus organizing must then be jettisoned or rethought?  And what new political possibilities might be opened up?

From 1969 to the Present: A Brief History Outlining the Critical Role of Women of Color in the Struggle for Ethnic Studies
Ziza Delgado, UC Berkeley

In 1969, when the Third World Liberation Front (TWLF) erupted at UC Berkeley, women of color organized in multifarious ways. Women of color brought to the movement their experiences as an oppressed group in their own communities, the institution, and their previous experience organizing in
other arenas such as the Civil Rights and Anti-War Movements. For many of the women who participated in the TWLF, the struggle was located not only in their contentious fights against the university, but also against male chauvinism from within their organizations. Today, I can say that as a
member of multiple Ethnic Studies alliances and coalitions, women are playing key leadership roles with the fervent support of our brothers in the movement. The coalitionary politics playing out in today’s struggle to maintain and expand Ethnic Studies, is reflective of the critical spaces and knowledge production that women of color have fought to establish in the intellectual and political realms. This presentation will discuss the shift in ideology and praxis of women of color, and their male comrades, in the struggle to *create* and *sustain* Ethnic Studies at UC Berkeley.

Catalyzing Knowledge in Dangerous Times

Center for Race & Gender, University of California-Berkeley
April 14, 2011

 

Presenter & Poet Bios

Hatem Bazian, received his Ph.D. in Philosophy from the University of California, Berkeley where he is currently a lecturer in the Departments of Near Eastern and Asian American Studies. Between 2002-2007, he also served as an adjunct professor of law at Boalt Hall School of Law. His teaching specialties include Islamic Law and Society, Islam in America: Communities and Institutions, De-Constructing Islamophobia and Othering of Islam, Religious Studies, and Middle Eastern Studies. In addition, Dr. Bazian is a visiting Professor in Religious Studies at Saint Mary’s College of California, is an advisor to the Religion, Politics and Globalization Center at UC Berkeley, and is Academic Affairs Chair at Zaytuna College of California. In Spring 2009, Dr. Bazian founded the Islamophobia Research and Documentation Project at UC Berkeley, a research program dedicated to the systematic study of Othering Islam and Muslims.

Ruben Elias Canedo Sanchez is a fourth year undergraduate double majoring in Ethnic Studies and Social Welfare and minoring in Education. He grew up in the border towns of Calexico, California and Mexicali, Baja California, Mexico, an area known for one of the highest Latino and undocumented populations in the country. Calexico is the third most impoverished city and has the highest amount of adults 16 and older that are illiterate in the state of California. Ruben graduated from Calexico High School, which consistently scores at a 2 or 3 API ranking, but that nevertheless continues to be the leading high school in the Imperial Valley to have students attend UC, CSU, and community colleges upon graduation, as well as, has the most students scoring 5 in the Spanish Language AP tests nationwide. Ruben had no idea UC Berkeley existed until the week of UC applications were due his senior year in high school. He gives thanks to the Regents and Chancellors Scholarship for providing him with the resources to pay for his education and the ability to continue to support his family back home. Ruben has been involved with the Summer Bridge Program, Student Life Advising Services/Educational Opportunity Program, the bridges multicultural coalition of recruitment and retention centers and is a member of the African American~Gender and Womyn~Ethnic Studies Family Alliance.

Micha Cárdenas is an artist/theorist whose transreal work mixes physical and networked spaces in order to explore emerging forms of queer relationality, biopolitics and DIY horizontal knowledge  production. She is the Interim Associate Director of Art and Technology for UCSD’s Sixth College in the Culture, Art and Technology program. She has been a lecturer in the Visual Arts department and Critical Gender Studies program at UCSD. She is an artist/researcher with the UCSD School of Medicine, CRCA and the b.a.n.g. lab at Calit2. Her recent publications include Trans Desire/Affective Cyborgs, with Barbara  Fornssler, from Atropos Press, “I am Transreal”, in Gender Outlaws: The  Next Generation from Seal Press and “Becoming Dragon: A Transversal  Technology Study” in Code Drift from CTheory. Her collaboration with Elle Mehrmand, “Mixed Relations,” was the recipient of the UCIRA  Emerging Fields Award for 2009. Her work has been written about in publications including Art21, the Associated Press, the LA Times, CNN,  BBC World, Wired and Rolling Stone Italy.

Piya Chatterjee is on the faculty of Women’s Studies at UC Riverside. She is interested in women’s labor histories and organizing, feminist ethnography and antiracist pedagogies. Her first book, A Time for Tea, was published by Duke University Press and Zubaan/Kali for Women, India. She is co-editor of States of Trauma: Gender and Violence. Piya lives bi-nationally and is involved with rural women’s organizing in eastern India, as well as US women of color activisms.  

Maya Chinchilla is a Central American/Guatemalan poet, performer, video artist, and community scholar. A two-spirit humble diva, she is a founding member of Las Manas: “three bad ass hermanas healing community through revolutionary artistry,” and is also the co-editor of “Desde el Epicentro: An Anthology of Central American Poetry and Art.”

Having received her PhD in Ethnic Studies at the University of California, Berkeley, Sara Clarke Kaplan is an assistant professor of Ethnic Studies and Critical Gender Studies and faculty affiliate of African American Studies at the University of California, San Diego. Her research and teaching focus on literatures and cultures of the Black Diaspora, woman-of-color feminisms, and queer theory, with special attention to popular culture and queer-of-color critique.  Her work has appeared in journals such as Callaloo, American Literary History, and Black Women, Gender, and Families. She is currently working on a book-length project on the Black reproductive as a critical technology of power through which Black subjugation and Black political subjectivity are imagined and materialized.

Cindy Cruz is an assistant professor in the Department of Education at UC Santa Cruz. Her research centers on the experiences of LGBTQ street youth, testimonio, race and the social body. Her work can be found in QSE:  The International Journal of Qualitative Studies in Education, Theory into Practice, The Lesbian Encyclopedia, and Chicana/Latina Education in Everyday Life: Feminista Perspectives on Pedagogy and Epistemology.   

Ziza Delgado is a first year graduate student in the Department of Ethnic Studies at UC Berkeley. She is a member of the Ethnic Studies Graduate Student Alliance and the African American Studies, Gender & Women’s Studies, and Ethnic Studies Undergraduate/Graduate Student Coalition. Her research interests include: radical social thought (through a critical ethnic studies lens), radical women of color, the neo-liberalization of higher education, and critical ideologies and discourses in education regarding issues of race, class, and gender. Ziza’s current projects involve research on Black Power movement history and ideology, the Third World Liberation Front and the history of Ethnic Studies, with special emphasis on the development of liberatory curriculum and pedagogy.  

Ricardo Dominguez is a co-founder of The Electronic Disturbance Theater (EDT), a group who developed Virtual-Sit-In technologies in 1998 in solidarity with the Zapatista communities in Chiapas, Mexico. He is co-Director of Thing (thing.net<http://thing.net>) an ISP for artists and activists. His recent Electronic Disturbance Theater project with Brett Stabaum, Micha Cardenas, Amy Sara Carroll and Elle Mehrmand the *Transborder Immigrant Tool* – http://bang.calit2.net/xborder (a GPS cellphone safety net tool for crossing the Mexico/U.S border was the winner of “Transnational Communities Award”, this award was funded by *Cultural Contact*, Endowment for Culture Mexico – U.S. and handed out by the U.S. Embassy in Mexico), also funded by CALIT2 and two Transborder Awards from the UCSD Center for the Humanities. Ricardo is an Associate Professor at UCSD in the Visual Arts Department, a Hellman Fellow, and Principal/Principle Investigator at CALIT2 – http://bang.calit2.net/. He also co-founder of *particle group* with artists Diane Ludin, Nina Waisman, Amy Sara Carroll a project about nanotechnology entitled *Particles of Interest: Tales of the Matter Market* (http://pitmm.net).

Kebo Drew joined Queer Women of Color Media Arts Project (QWOCMAP) as its second staff member in 2007 as a Horizons Foundation Rickey William Leader Fellow, when she developed and expanded the QWOCMAP Community Partner program.  She also conceived QWOCMAP’s signature presentation “Reels of Resistance: Film IS Social Justice Activism.”  Born in Memphis, Drew is a 2nd generation activist.  She is also an award-winning poet, dancer and writer who has performed throughout the U.S., Latin America and Europe. A Cave Canem Poetry Fellow, Drew has won the Audre Lorde/Pat Parker Award and the Astraea Emerging Lesbian Writers Award.  She has also won the Irene Weed Dance Award and Robert Kuykendall Dance Scholarship.

Nada Elia is professor of Gender and Global Studies at Antioch University – Seattle.  She is the author of Trances, Dances, and Vociferations:  Agency and Resistance in Africana Women’s Narratives, as well as numerous essays on Islamophobia, Arab feminisms, and Palestinian non-violent resistance.   She has served on the boards of AWSA (Arab Women’s Solidarity Association), AMWAJ (Arab Movement of Women Arising for Justice), on the national collective of INCITE! Women of Color Against Violence, and is currently a member of the Organizing Collective of USACBI, the US Campaign for the Academic and Cultural Boycott of Israel.

Isela González is the HIV Prevention Services Coordinator, for the Forensic AIDS Project, a program of Jail Health Services, the San Francisco Department of Public Health service division responsible for providing healthcare services to prisoners in the San Francisco city and county jails. She has over 16 years experience providing HIV prevention and care services, the past 14 years working specifically with incarcerated adult men, women and transgenders.   She has been instrumental in ensuring that prisoners in the SF jails receive HIV/STI/HCV prevention and care services comparable to those offered in the community.  Most recently she co-led the From the Center digital storytelling project with Margaret Rhee in the SF jails. She is one of two Community Co-Chairs for the San Francisco HIV Prevention Planning Council and is the SF steering representative on the Urban Coalition for HIV/AIDS Prevention Services.  She served on Mayor Gavin Newsom’s 2010 Hepatitis C Task Force.  She is a member of the San Francisco HIV Prevention Section’s Transgender Advisory Group (TAG); is a CAB member of; TRANS:THRIVE, Transgender Empowerment And Motivational Intervention study, and the Transgender Economic Empowerment Initiative. She has been a mentor to San Francisco State University undergraduate and graduate students, as well as City College of San Francisco students.  She received a Masters in Public Administration, with a Health Services Emphasis from the University of San Francisco in 2004, and holds a B.A. in History and Latin American Studies from Notre Dame de Namur University.

Allyse Gray is the Bay Area for Positive Health (BANPH) Engagement and Linkage Specialist, for the Forensic AIDS Project (FAP), a program of Jail Health Services, the San Francisco Department of Public Health. Allyse has worked, volunteered, and collaborated with FAP for the past 4 years. She started working with incarcerated and formerly incarcerated populations on the RISE project (Reach Inward for Self Empowerment) with SFSU, where she contributed as a participant and co-researcher. She has worked for the San Francisco Sheriff’s Department Women’s Re-Entry Center, with formerly incarcerated women and continues serving this population through the San Francisco Pretrial Diversion Project Inc’s Parole Re-Entry Court (PRC) working with paroled men. She is dedicated to this field of work and is furthering her education in community health work. Allyse is currently a full time student at City College of San Francisco and has plans of transferring to a four year institution in the next year.

Alexis Pauline Gumbs is the instigator of the Eternal Summer of the Black Feminist Mind as a project of BrokenBeautiful Press and the co-creator of the Mobilehomecoming Project.  Alexis has a PhD in English, Africana Studies and Women’s Studies from Duke University and has been honored by UTNE Reader as one 50 visionaries transforming the world, Black Women’s Blueprint as a Black Woman Rising, Reproductive Justice Reality Check as a Reproductive Justice Shero and BrokenBeautiful Press recently received a glittery trophy from the “Too Sexy for 501c3” awards.

Luna Maia is an award winning San Francisco based Mestiza Queer poet who writes about issues of mixed heritage, feminism, and gender identity. Luna Maia’s work has been published in several anthologies and literary journals including Yellow Medicine Review and Loudmouth Zine. Find out more at www.lunamaia.com

Nelson Maldonado-Torres is professor of Comparative Literature at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, currently on leave from Ethnic Studies at UC Berkeley. He specializes in phenomenology, critical theory, postcolonial studies, and modern religious thought. He is interested in theories of decolonization as they emerge in different contexts and from different subjective positions in the Americas. Currently, he is working on a book-length project entitled Fanonian Meditations, which aims to spell out the epistemological basis of “ethnic studies” and related areas, as well as examine the relevance of decolonization at the epistemological, ethical, and political levels.

Evelyn Nakano Glenn is the Director of the Center for Race and Gender and Professor of Women’s Studies and Ethnic Studies at UC Berkeley. Her teaching and research interests focus on transdisciplinary methods, political economy of households, the intersection of race and gender, immigration, and citizenship. Her articles have appeared such journals as Social Problems, Signs, Feminist Studies, Social Science History, Stanford Law Review, Contemporary Sociology, and Review of Radical Political Economy, as well as in numerous edited volumes. She is the author of Issei, Nisei, War Bride: Three Generations of Japanese American Women in Domestic Service (Temple University Press), Mothering: Ideology, Experience and Agency (Routledge), and Unequal Freedom,How Race and Gender Shaped American Citizen and Labor (Harvard University Press).  Professor Glenn has recently published her newest book Forced to Care: Coercion and Caregiving in America (Harvard University Press) and the edited volume Shades of Difference: Why Skin Color Matters (Stanford University Press).

OLO, or One Love Oceania, is a Pacific Islander queer women’s support, art and activist organization located in the Bay Area, California.  OLO’s multi-medium performances explore the complexities and intersections of gender, sexualities, class, race, colonialisms, resistance movements, and Pacific Islander diasporic histories.

Julia C. Oparah (formerly Sudbury), Professor and Chair of Ethnic Studies at Mills College, is an activist scholar, educator and writer who has been involved in racial and gender justice and antiprison movements in the U.S., U.K. and Canada for two decades. She is author of Other Kinds of Dreams: Black Women¹s Organizations and the Politics of Transformation and editor of Global Lockdown: Race, Gender and the Prison-Industrial Complex; Outsiders Within: Writing on Transracial Adoption; and Activist Scholarship: Antiracism, Feminism and Social Change. Julia has worked with Critical Resistance, Incite!, Prison Activist Resource Center, Prisoner Justice Action Committee, Toronto and Arizona Prison Moratorium Coalition. She is most recently co-founder of Black Women Birthing Justice, a participatory research and outreach initiative. She is a queer mom and her daughter Onyekachi was born in May 2010.

 Laura E. Pérez is an associate professor and head graduate advisor of the doctoral program in the Department of Ethnic Studies at UC Berkeley.  She is also a core faculty member of the doctoral program in Performance Studies and an affiliated faculty member of the Department of Women’s Studies and the Center for Latin American Studies.  She has served as the Coordinator the Chicana/o Latina/o Studies Program and directed the Beatrice M. Bain Research Group on Gender.  Her research and teaching focus on post-sixties U.S. Latina/o literary, visual, and performance arts; “U.S. women of color” (a.k.a “third world”) feminist and queer thought; art and spirituality; racialization and the cultural politics and economics of the artworld(s); and theories of oppositionality and decolonization.  She is the author of Chicana Art: The Politics of Spiritual and Aesthetic Altarities (Duke UP 2007).   Her essays on Latina/o spirituality have appeared in Decolonial Voices: Chicana/os Studies in the 21st Century, Latino/as in the World-System:  Decolonization Struggles in the 21st Century U.S. Empire, Rethinking Latino(a) Religion and Identity (De la Torre and Espinosa 2006),  Mexican American Religions:  Spirituality, Activism, and Culture, and Rhetorics of the Americas, 3114 BCE to 2012 CE.  In spring of 2009, she co-curated the art exhibition Chicana Badgirls: Las Hociconas, at the 516 Gallery, in Albuquerque.  She is curator of the exhibition “Labor+a(r)t+orio: Bay Area Latin@ Arts Now” that opens April 12th and runs through June 10th, 2011.  She is at present co-editing The@-Erotics:  Decolonizing Sex and Spiritualities in the Latin@Americas and at work on a new book on U.S. women of color queer feminism, decolonizing spiritualities, and non-violence.

Queer Women of Color Media Arts Project (QWOCMAP) creates, exhibits and distributes new films that authentically reflect the lives of queer women of color and address the vital social justice issues that concern multiple American communities.  We bridge seemingly disparate populations to transform and empower our participants, audiences, communities through art, activism and community building to spark grassroots activism and the social justice movement.  Our vision nurtures queer women of color filmmakers as artist-activist leaders to create systemic change and lead social justice movements that incorporate the power of art as cultural resistance and cultural renewal.

 Andrea Smith is an Associate Professor in the Department of Cultural and Media Studies at UC Riverside.  Prof. Smith received her Ph.D. in History of Consciousness at UC Santa Cruz in 2002.  Her publications include: Native Americans and the Christian Right: The Gendered Politics of Unlikely Alliances and Conquest: Sexual Violence and American Indian Genocide.  She is also the editor of The Revolution Will Not Be Funded: Beyond the Nonprofit Industrial Complex, and co-editor of The Color of Violence, The Incite! Anthology.  She currently serves as the U.S. Coordinator for the Ecumenical Association of Third World Theologians, and she is a co-founder of Incite! Women of Color Against Violence.  She recently completed a report for the United Nations on Indigenous Peoples and Boarding Schools.

Jezebel Delilah X is a fierce fat femme faerie princess and English Instructor who uses literature, performance, storytelling, and flirting to advance her politics of radical love, economic equity, and empowerment through literacy. She holds an MFA in English and Creative Writing with an emphasis in Fiction from Mills College.

 

The conference featured an exhibit of Ethnic Studies political art by Favianna Rodriguez, Jesus Barraza, & Natalia Garcia Pasmanick, curated by Elisa Diana Huerta, Multicultural Community Center, UC Berkeley

CONFERENCE CURATORS STATEMENT

The work of graphic artists is inextricably connected to liberatory and grassroots struggles throughout the world. For this small exhibition, we have brought together local Bay Area artists who have directly participated in the struggle for Ethnic Studies and a Third World College under the banner of twLF (third world Liberation Front) from 1999 to the present on the UC Berkeley campus.  The works of Jesus Barraza & Melanie Cervantes (dignidadrebelde.com), Natalia Garcia Pasmanick and Favianna Rodriguez (favianna.com) embody social justice based movements and solidarities, both local and global, within which communities of color continue to resist, create and transform. – Elisa Diana Huerta