Political Conflict, Gender and People’s Rights Initiative

Political Conflict, Gender and People’s Rights Initiative

Background image: Silhouette of person lying down

The Political Conflict, Gender and People’s Rights Initiative (PCRes) is housed at the Center for Race and Gender at the University of California, Berkeley.  PCRes focuses on political conflict and gendered and attendant sexualized violences at the intersections of minoritization, majoritarianism, the racialization of difference, and decolonial responses and movements.

Interdisciplinary in practice and rooted in local knowledge, the project contends with the condition of quotidian and protracted violence and the contested terrain of social justice and people’s rights. It seek to understand how those affected/those “Othered” live with social suffering and death-bound conditions and ameliorate their effects, define mechanisms justice and accountability, seeks psychosocial healing and political solutions, and undertakes the work of archiving and memorialization. PCRes expands on methods in justice and accountability, drawing on diverse imaginaries, and situated and comparative contexts to address routinized states of emergency and exception. The Initiative works with a collaborative network of victimized-survivor-subjects, scholars, and academic and civil society leaders and institutions. PCRes focuses on the centrality of political and foundational violence in contested regions and nation-states of the (post)colony, initially with particular emphasis on South Asia.

Silhouette of person lying down with flower above them

About PCRes

ENABLING CRITICAL THOUGHT AND INQUIRY

The Armed Conflict Resolution and People’s Rights Project, instituted in April 2012 at the Center for Social Sector Leadership, Haas School of Business, was precursor to the Political Conflict, Gender and People’s Rights Research Initiative. After completion of its first and successful phase, the projectmovedto the Center for Race and Gender (CRG) in January 2016, to further enabl interdisciplinary commitments in the next phase of its work. A pioneering, interdisciplinary research center, CRG houses research initiatives and working groups concerned with race and gender (as well as coloniality and other relations of power), allowing them to develop freely and flourish.


Temporal and spatial, landscapes of political and foundational violence contour capillaries and relations of power that are prohibitive and productive, constituting and circumscribing forms of knowledge, subjectivity and governance. In the (post)colony in South Asia, apparatuses of majoritarian, (trans)nationalist, and religionized violence and militarization assist in the securitization of nation (toward assimilation, elimination, and annihilation). Across conflict zones and spaces of mass violence, violent death and the threat of death, torture, maiming, disappearances, and dispossession function to routinize states of emergency, siege and exception. Conflict-based and upheaval-ridden political economies witness the dramatic amplification of social inequities under neoliberal, majoritarian states. Violence in conflict and upheaval is disbursed through “extrajudicial” means and those authorized by law and politics. Targeted communities and decolonial movements, too, use violence as response. Death and social death, prevalent across the culturescape and in the social sub-strata, are memorialized via language and iconography.

How are archaeologies of violence illustrative of the gendered, racialized and religionized dynamics of minoritization? How are the conditions and events of violence gendered and sexualized? How do assemblages of racialization and gendering constitute death-bound subjects? How is violence used to sustain and re-work the minoritization of an Other? What critical practices of mourning, memorialization and the sacred emerge in response to a politics of violence that agentizes multiple relations to justice, struggle, difference and accountability?

Students:  PCRes provides internship opportunities for exceptional graduate students and select undergraduate students from UC Berkeley and other institutions, and from local communities. The Research Initiative engages age-appropriate youth from affected communities in the work of documenting remembrance, and creating an archive and curated presentations.


People of PCRes

Angana with red scarf

Angana P. Chatterji

Co-Chair, Political Conflict, Gender and People’s Rights Research Initiative
Research Anthropologist, UC Berkeley

Angana P. Chatterjiis Co-chair, Political Conflict, Gender and People’s Rights Research Initiative and Research Anthropologist at the Center for Race and Gender at the University of California, Berkeley (and Founding Co-chair of the precursor, Armed Conflict Resolution and People’s Rights Project at the Center for Social Sector Leadership, Haas School of Business, 2012-2015). A cultural anthropologist, she focuses her scholarly work on issues of political conflict; gender, power and violence; majoritarian nationalism, minoritization and racialization; religion in the public sphere, religious freedom; and reparatory justice and cultural survival. Chatterji’s scholarship bears witness to postcolonial, decolonial conditions of grief, dispossession, and agency.

Paola wearing grey shawl and smiling

Paola Bacchetta

Co-Chair, Political Conflict, Gender and People’s Rights Research Initiative
Professor, Department of Gender and Women’s Studies

Paola Bachetta is a Professor of the Department of Gender and Women’s Studies at University of California, Berkeley. Her books include:Co-Motion: Situated Planetarities, Co-Formations and Co-Productions in Feminist and Queer Alliances, forthcoming, Duke University Press;Femminismi Queer Postcoloniali: critiche transnazionali all’omofobia, all’islamofobia e all’omonazionalismo(Queer Postcolonial Feminisms: Transnational Critiques of Homophobia, Islamophobia and Homonationalism), contributing co-editor with Laura Fantone, Verona, Italy: Ombre Corte, 2015;Gender in the Hindu Nation: RSS Women as Ideologues,India: Women Ink, 2004;Right-Wing Women: From Conservatives to Extremists around the World, contributing co-editor with Margaret Power, New York: Routledge, 2002;Textes du Mouvement Lesbien en France, 1970-2000(Texts from the French Lesbian Movement, 1970-2000), co-editor with Claudie Lesselier, on DVD, self-published, 2011; andGlobal Racialities: Empire, Decoloniality and Post-Coloniality, co-edited with Sunaina Maira, forthcoming with Routledge. Professor Bacchetta has published about fifty academic journal articles and book chapters in many languages, on questions of gender, race, queer subjects, (de)colonialities, capitalism, political conflict, Islamophobia and social movements.


PCRes Distinguished Scholars

(Bios reflect scholars’ status at the time of their appointment at the Center for Race and Gender.)

Parvez with curtain background

Parvez Imroz

Parvez Imroz is a Distinguished Scholar (non-resident), Political Conflict, Gender and People’s Rights Initiative at the Center for Race and Gender at the University of California, Berkeley. Imroz is a Member of the Bar (Advocate) at the Jammu and Kashmir High Court and Founding President, Jammu Kashmir Coalition of Civil Society (JKCCS). Imroz has been working to secure human rights and equality before the law in Kashmir since the late 1980s. He has initiated and led formative campaigns for human rights in a context of impunity and grave rights violations: including gendered and sexualized violence, torture, rapes, enforced disappearances, and extrajudicial executions. Imroz has filed thousands of habeas corpus  actions on behalf of families whose relatives have disappeared while in state custody. In 1994, he founded the Association of Parents of Disappeared Persons (APDP), which brings together hundreds of Kashmiri families whose members have been subjected to enforced disappearances. In 2008, Imroz and Angana Chatterji co-convened the International People’s Tribunal on Human Rights and Justice in Indian-administered Kashmir (IPTK) and its formative report is entitled: BURIED EVIDENCE: Unknown, Unmarked, and Mass Graves in Kashmir(link is external) (2009). He is a contributing author of numerous reports, including: Structures of Violence (2012); Terrorized: Impact of Violence on the Children of Jammu and Kashmir (2018); and Torture: Indian State’s Instrument of Control in Indian Administered Jammu and Kashmir (2019). Imroz is a recipient of the Ludovic-Trarieux International Human Rights Prize by Human Rights Institute of The Bar of Bordeaux, France and the European Bar Human Rights Institute. In 2017, Imroz was awarded the Rafto Prize.

Christopher looking forward

Christophe Jaffrelot

Christophe Jaffrelot is a Distinguished Scholar (non-resident), Political Conflict, Gender and People’s Rights Initiative at the Center for Race and Gender at the University of California, Berkeley. Jaffrelot is a Senior Research Fellow at Centre d’Etudes et de Recherches Internationales at Sciences Po, Paris; Research Director at Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, and Professor of Indian Politics and Sociology at the India Institute, King’s College, London.



Khurram with beige coat

Khurram Parvez

Khurram Parvez is a Distinguished Scholar (non-resident), Political Conflict, Gender and People’s Rights Initiative at the Center for Race and Gender at the University of California, Berkeley. Parvez is Chairperson of the Asian Federation against Involuntary Disappearances(link is external) and Program Coordinator, Jammu Kashmir Coalition of Civil Society and a human rights defender. Parvez was gravely injured in April 2004, when the vehicle he was travelling in during a fieldwork trip was hit in an IED explosion, leading to the death of two colleagues and the eventual amputation of his right leg. In 2007, his pioneering work with the International Campaign to Ban Landmines (ICBL) led to the signing of the Unilateral Declaration of Mine Ban by the United Jehad Council, an amalgam of various militant organizations operating in India-Administered Kashmir. In 2006, Khurram received the Reebok Human Rights Award. From December 2005 to April 2006, Parvez was a Chevening Fellow at University of Glasgow, UK. In 2009, he participated in the United States Government’s International Visitors’ Leadership Program. In 2008, with Angana Chatterji and Parvez Imroz, Khurram Parvez was a founding member of the International People’s Tribunal on Human Rights and Justice in Indian-administered Kashmir (IPTK). He is a contributing author of numerous reports, including: BURIED EVIDENCE: Unknown, Unmarked, and Mass Graves in Kashmir(link is external) (2009); Structures of Violence (2012); Terrorized: Impact of Violence on the Children of Jammu and Kashmir (2018); and Torture: Indian State’s Instrument of Control in Indian Administered Jammu and Kashmir (2019).


PCRes Publications

Title Author Year Publication type
BREAKING WORLDS: Religion, Law and Citizenship in Majoritarian India; The Story of Assam Angana P. Chatterji; Mihir Desai; Harsh Mander; Abdul Kalam Azad 2021 Monograph, 2021
Gendered and Sexual Violence in and beyond South Asia Angana P. Chatterji 2016 Journal Article, 2016

PCRes Events

Breaking Worlds Banner for Event

Monograph Release -- “Breaking Worlds: Religion, Law and Citizenship In Majoritarian India; The Story Of Assam”

09.09.2021| 9:00 – 10:30 AM |  Virtual - Zoom Webinar

Join us for a virtual event to release the monograph, BREAKING WORLDS: Religion, Law, Citizenship in Majoritarian India; The Story of Assam with a keynote from Dr. Navi Pillay (UN High Commissioner for Human Rights 2008-2014 and Judge Ad Hoc International Court of Justice (The Gambia v. Myanmar), with panel chair Michael Kugelman (Woodrow Wilson Center), and monograph author and contributors Dr. Angana P. Chatterji (UC Berkeley Political Conflict, Gender and People’s Rights Initiative), Mihir Desai (Legal Scholar & Human Rights Counsel), Dr. Harsh Mander (Human Rights Advocate & Author), and Abdul Kalam Azad (Scholar).

---
Presented by the Political Conflict, Gender and People’s Rights Initiative, Center for Race and Gender at UC Berkeley. Co-sponsored by the Institute for South Asia Studies, and the Department of Gender and Women’s Studies at UC Berkeley.

READ - Click here to download “Breaking Worlds: Religion, Law and Citizenship In Majoritarian India; The Story Of Assam”



11-27-2018 PCRes Event

The Practice Of Freedom: Impunity, Justice, And The Law

11.27.2018| 5:00 – 6:30 PM |  Goldberg Room, 297 Simon Hall, Berkeley Law

The Practice Of Freedom: Impunity, Justice, And The Law 
with Navi Pillay, United Nations High Commissioner For Human Rights, 2008-2014 And Judge On The International Criminal Court, 2003-2008

Judge Navanethem ‘Navi’ Pillay will speak to her work spanning the struggle for freedom in South Africa, on the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda, on the International Criminal Court, and as the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, including her current work on international justice and against the death penalty.

Opening remarks by:
Professor Leti Volpp, Robert D. and Leslie Kay Raven Professor of Law in Access to Justice at Berkeley Law and Director, Center for Race and Gender

Moderated by:
Angana Chatterji, Founding Co-chair, Project on Political Conflict, Gender and People’s Rights and Visiting Research Anthropologist, Center for Race and Gender

Discussants:
Professor Abdul R. JanMohamed, Department of English

Professor Mariane C. Ferme, Anthropology and African Studies and Curator of African Ethnology at the Hearst Museum of Anthropology

Professor Paola Bacchetta, Gender and Women’s Studies and Co-chair, Project on Political Conflict, Gender and People’s Rights

Professor Managay Reddi, Dean and Head of the School of Law, University of Kwazulu-Natal at Durban and Advocate of the High Court of South Africa

Professor Christoph Safferling, Chair for Criminal Law, Criminal Procedure, International Criminal Law and Public International Law, Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nürnberg


BIO
Judge Pillay was raised in apartheid South Africa. Of the Tamil Diaspora, her grandparents were indentured to South Africa from the Madras Presidency in colonized India in the late nineteenth century. Navi Pillay grew up with a passionate dedication to challenge and remedy injustice. Dr. Pillay was the first non-white woman to start a law practice in her home in Natal in 1967. During the 28-years she worked as a “colored” lawyer, Navi Pillay had not been permitted to set foot in a judge’s chambers. She provided legal defense for opponents of apartheid, including members of the African National Congress, Unity Movement, Black Consciousness Movement and Azanian People’s Organization. In 1973, Pillay won the right for political prisoners on Robben Island, including Nelson Mandela, to have access to lawyers. She worked as a lecturer at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, and was later appointed Vice-President of the Council of the University of Durban Westville. She contributed to the inclusion of an equality clause in the constitution of South Africa in her capacity as a member of the Women’s National Coalition in South Africa. In 1995, Dr. Pillay was appointed Acting Judge in the High Court of South Africa, by appointment of then President Nelson Mandela.  She was the first woman of color and first attorney to serve on the bench. In 1995, Dr. Pillay was elected by the United Nations General Assembly to serve as a judge at the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda, a post she held for eight years, including as its president between 1999 and 2002. In this role, she is best remembered for the ruling that rape and sexual assault constitute acts of genocide, stating: “Rape had always been regarded as one of the spoils of war,” “Now it is a war crime, no longer a trophy.”  In 2003, she was elected by the Assembly of State Parties, The Hague, as a judge on the International Criminal Court, a post she held until 2008. Thereafter, Judge Pillay served as United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights from September 2008-2014. Her responsibilities, she said, demanded she work for no less than the full protection of all human rights for all individuals – civil and political rights, economic and social rights – especially for neglected groups, such as women, children, minorities, migrants, indigenous people, those with disabilities, and lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people. Dr. Pillay received a BA and a LLB from Natal University South Africa and holds a Master of Law and a Doctorate of Juridical Science from Harvard University. She is the recipient of the Commandeur de l’Ordre National de la Légion d’Honneur (award of Commander in the French Legion of Honor, 2016) and numerous honorary doctorates, including from Durham University, City University of New York School of Law, London School of Economics and Tufts University. Judge Pillay co-founded the Advice Desk for the Abused in South Africa and Equality Now, an international women’s rights organization, and has been involved with organizations working on issues relating to children, detainees, victims of torture and of domestic violence, and a range of economic, social and cultural rights.

---
Co-sponsored by the International Human Rights Law Clinic, Miller Institute for Global Challenges and the Law, Gender and Women’s Studies at UC Berkeley, UC Berkeley School of Law, and the University of Kwazulu-Natal at Durban.



Flyer for PCRes Event on 4-11-2018

What Is “Populism”? From Zombie Neoliberalism To Racial Nationalism In Global Right Organizing

04.11.2018| 5:00 – 6:30 PM |  370 Dwinelle Hall

What Is “Populism”?  From Zombie Neoliberalism To Racial Nationalism In Global Right Organizing
with Lisa DugganProfessor of Social and Cultural Analysis, New York University

Presided and Moderated by: Professor Paola Bacchetta, Department of Gender and Women’s Studies; Co-chair, Project on Political Conflict, Gender and People’s Rights, Center for Race & Gender, UC Berkeley

Speaker Introduced by: Angana Chatterji, Visiting Research Anthropologist and Co-chair, Project on Political Conflict, Gender and People’s Rights, Center for Race and Gender, UC Berkeley

BIO
Lisa Duggan is Professor of Social and Cultural Analysis at New York University. She is the author of Twilight of Equality: Neoliberalism, Cultural Politics, and the Attack on Democracy.  She is also the coeditor of Our Monica, Ourselves: The Clinton Affair and the National Interest and author of Sapphic Slashers: Sex, Violence, and American Modernity, which won the John Boswell Prize of the American Historical Association in 2001.

---
Presented by CRG's Political Conflict, Gender and People’s Rights Project.  Co-sponsored by the Department of Gender & Women’s Studies, Geography Department, English Department, and the Program in Critical Theory.



Flyer for 4-11-207 PCRes Event

Advancing Human Rights in a Rightward World: Challenges for International Institutions and Civil Society

04.03.2017 | 5:00 – 6:30 PM |  Goldberg Room, 297 Simon Hall, Berkeley Law

Advancing Human Rights in a Rightward World: Challenges for International Institutions and Civil Society
with Navi Pillay, United Nations High Commissioner For Human Rights, 2008-2014 And Judge On The International Criminal Court, 2003-2008

Opening Remarks: Paul Alivisatos, Vice Chancellor for Research and Samsung Distinguished Professor of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, UC Berkeley

Introductions by Angana P. Chatterji, Visiting Research Anthropologist and Co-chair, Project on Political Conflict, Gender and People’s Rights, Center for Race and Gender, UC, Berkeley

Moderated by Laurel E. Fletcher, Clinical Professor of Law & Director of the International Human Rights Law Clinic, School of Law, UC, Berkeley

---
Co-sponsored by University of California, Berkeley -- Department of Gender and Women’s Studies. Human Rights Center, Berkeley School of Law. Institute for South Asia Studies. International and Area Studies, International Human Rights Law Clinic, Berkeley School of Law, Miller Institute For Global Challenges and the Law, Berkeley School Of Law, CRG's Research Working Group - Muslim Identities and Cultures, the Townsend Center, Institute for the Study of Human Rights at Columbia University, and the WSD HANDA Center for Human Rights and International Justice, at Stanford University.



Flyer for 11-10-2016 PCRes Event

Sambo: A (Post)Colonial (Mis)Education

11.10.2016 | 5:00 – 7:00 PM |  Maude Fife Room, Hearst Annex D-37, UC Berkeley

Sambo: A (Post)Colonial (Mis)Education
with Abdul R. JanMohamed, English

Presided and Moderated by: Professor Paola Bacchetta, Department of Gender and Women’s Studies; Co-chair, Project on Political Conflict, Gender and People’s Rights, Center for Race & Gender, UC Berkeley

Speaker Introduced by: Angana Chatterji, Visiting Research Anthropologist and Co-chair, Project on Political Conflict, Gender and People’s Rights, Center for Race and Gender, UC Berkeley

How does the (Post)Colonial world configure its subjects? Having examined this question in the past from scholarly, critical and analytic viewpoints, Abdul R. JanMohamed now turns to the more subjective, autobiographical experiences that have triggered, conditioned and fueled his distinguished body of scholarly/critical accounts on the subject. This presentation will focus on two singular occurrences from JanMohamed’s childhood: first, being interpellated in a British boarding school as “Sambo,” a comic and pathetic creature who was nevertheless deemed capable of corrupting the morals of innocent English schoolboys; second, being configured as a death-bound-subject, one commanded to absolute silence via the deployment of violence, which was in turn invariably supplemented by the threat of death. The first correlates with Manichean Aesthetics (1983) and the second with The Death-Bound-Subject (2005).

---
Hosted by the Political Conflict, Gender and People’s Rights Project, Center for Race and Gender.  Co-sponsored by the Center for British Studies, Department of English, Department of Gender and Women's Studies, Institute for the Study of South Asia, Townsend Center for the Humanities, and CRG's Research Working Group - Muslim Identities and Cultures.



Flyer for 10-2016 PCRes Event

The Dargah Culture in Ajmer Sharif: An Antidote to Hindu-Muslim Conflicts?

10.28.2016 | 3:00 – 5:00 PM |  Institute for South Asia Studies Conference Room, 10 Stephens Hall

The Dargah Culture in Ajmer Sharif: An Antidote to Hindu-Muslim Conflicts?
with Christophe JaffrelotSenior Research Fellow at Centre d’Etudes et de Recherches Internationales at Sciences Po, Paris: Research Director at Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique; and Professor of Indian Politics and Sociology at the India Institute, King College, London.

Presided and Moderated by: Professor Paola Bacchetta, Department of Gender and Women’s Studies; Co-chair, Project on Political Conflict, Gender and People’s Rights, Center for Race & Gender, UC Berkeley

Speaker Introduced by: Angana Chatterji, Visiting Research Anthropologist and Co-chair, Project on Political Conflict, Gender and People’s Rights, Center for Race and Gender, UC Berkeley


The Dargah culture of Sufi saints developed around Sufi tombs and shrines from the Middle Ages onwards. The cultures of the Dargah contributed to anchoring Islam across (what is today) Indian territory. Highlighting Ajmer Sharif, this talk explores the cultural and spiritual relations of non-Muslims, including of Hindus and Hindtuva, to the cultures of the Dargah.

---
Hosted by the Political Conflict, Gender and People’s Rights Project, Center for Race and Gender.  Co-sponsored by the Institute for South Asia Studies at UC Berkeley, and the Center for South Asia at Stanford University.



Flyer for 4-2016 PCRes Event

Columbus Goes East: Renaming Palestine

04.12.2016 | 5:00 – 7:00 PM |  Maude Fife Room, 315 Wheeler Hall

Columbus Goes East: Renaming Palestine
with Abdul-Rahim Al-Shaikh, Associate Professor of Philosophy and Cultural and Arab Studies, Birzeit University and Fulbright Scholar, 2015-1016, at the Center for Palestine Studies, Columbia University

Discussant: Samera Esmeir, Associate Professor, Department of Rhetoric, University of California, Berkeley

Event introduced by Professor Paola Bacchetta, Department of Gender and Women’s Studies, UC, Berkeley; Co-chair, Project on Political Conflict, Gender and People’s Rights

Speaker and Discussant Introduced by Angana Chatterji, Co-chair, Project on Political Conflict, Gender and People’s Rights, Center for Race and Gender, UC, Berkeley, and Visiting Scholar, Institute for the Study of Human Rights, Columbia University


Based on an extensive photo archive of road signs, this talk interrogates the colonial politics of toponymy within historic Palestine from as early as 1856. The talk constructs a genealogy of names commissions and their inherent, zionist politics. It elaborates on the modes of resistance against these colonial politics and examines the political, cultural, and artistic effects of map transformations on Palestinian imaginations.

---
Hosted by Project on Political Conflict, Gender and People’s Rights, Center for Race and Gender.  Co-sponsored by Center for Middle Eastern Studies, Department of English, Department of Gender and Women’s Studies, Department of Geography, Townsend Center for the Humanities Working Group and CRG Working Group on Muslim Identities and Cultures, Islamophobia Research and Documentation Project.



Flyer for 3-3-2016 PCRes Event

Political Conflict and Gender Rights in South Asia

03.03.2016 | 5:00 – 7:00 PM |  170 Boalt Hall

Political Conflict and Gender Rights in South Asia
with Meenakshi Ganguly, South Asia Director at Human Rights Watch (HRW)

Event Introduced by Professor Evelyn Nakano Glenn, Director, Center for Race and Gender and Professor (Emerita), Departments of Ethnic Studies and Gender and Women’s Studies

Speaker Introduced by Angana Chatterji, Co-chair, Project on Political Conflict, Gender and People’s Rights, Center for Race and Gender, University of California, Berkeley, and Visiting Scholar, Institute for the Study of Human Rights, Columbia University

Moderated by Professor Paola Bacchetta, Department of Gender and Women’s Studies, University of California, Berkeley; Co-chair, Project on Political Conflict, Gender and People’s Rights

Political violence is currently normalized in many sites across South Asia. Armed insurgencies, state security operations and right-wing attacks against minorities and other vulnerable populations lead to serious human rights abuses. Gender organization in South Asia impacts political conflict, producing tremendous gender violence and social constraints across gendered positionalities and identities. Depending upon the context, the gendered effects of such conflict can be especially harsh on women who are targeted in the violence. Culturally and politically marginalized, women remain particularly vulnerable to violent attacks, including sexual assault. They also very often lose their livelihood in the violence. When they function as de facto heads of households women often experience dramatically increased social exclusion, with all the despair that such exclusion entails. Many of the crimes against women that take place during periods of political conflict remain unreported. This talk speaks to all these issues. It highlights the ways in which women victimized-survivors are isolated and how they struggle to find justice and to have access to redress.

BIO
Meenakshi Ganguly is the South Asia Director at Human Rights Watch. She is the author and coordinator of numerous human rights reports produced for Human Rights Watch. She has also has written extensively on human rights related challenges across South Asia: in Bangladesh, Burma, India, Nepal, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka, including on the political conflicts in Jammu and Kashmir, Manipur, and Punjab. She has investigated a broad range of issues. Some of these are: discrimination against marginalized and minoritized groups; issues of religious freedom; peoples’ rights violations related to political and armed conflict; the precarity and violence against women and children in political conflict, including sexual abuse; bringing abusive members of state forces and combatants to justice; police reform;and human rights approaches to foreign policy.  She has also worked on questions such as: immigrant and labor rights; discrimination against people living with HIV/AIDS; the rights of men who have sex with men; and various LGBTIQ+ communities.  Before joining Human Rights Watch in 2004, Ganguly served as the South Asia Correspondent for Time Magazine, covering Afghanistan, Pakistan, Nepal, India, Bangladesh, and Sri Lanka. At present she also serves as a member of the Working Group of the Political Conflict, Gender and People’s Rights Project based at the Center for Race and Gender at the University of California, Berkeley.

---
Hosted by Project on Political Conflict, Gender and People’s Rights, Center for Race and Gender.  Co-sponsored by the Center for the Study of Sexual Cultures, University of California, Berkeley; Center for South Asia, Stanford University; Department of Gender and Women’s Studies, University of California, Berkeley; International and Area Studies, University of California, Berkeley; International Human Rights Law Clinic, University of California, Berkeley School of Law; Institute for the Study of Human Rights, Columbia University; The Human Rights Program, University of California, Berkeley; Townsend Center for the Humanities Working Group and CRG Working Group on Muslim Identities and Cultures, University of California, Berkeley; WSD HANDA Center for Human Rights and International Justice at Stanford University.




PCRes Collaborative Network:  People and Partners

RESEARCH ASSOCIATES

PCRes is generously assisted by:

  • Alejandro Urruzmendi, Doctoral Student, 2013-present: Department of Education, University of San Francisco | Expected 2018
  • Pei Wu, Independent Scholar

PARTNERS

Academic Institutions:

  • Standford University Libraries
  • WSD Handa Center for Human Rights and International Justice
  • Center for Human Rights Documentation & Research, Columbia University (Between 2013 – 2017)
  • Institute for the Study of Human Rights, Columbia University (Between 2013 – 2017)
  • International Human Rights Law Clinic, School of Law, University of California, Berkeley (Between 2013 – 2015)
  • International Human Rights and Conflict Resolution Clinic, Stanford University Law School (Between 2012-2014)

Regional and Diaspora Civil Society Organizations:

  • Apne Aap Women Worldwide (holding special consultative status with the Economic and Social Council, United Nations)
  • Asian Federation Against Involuntary Disappearances, Philippines
  • Asian Human Rights Commission, Hong Kong
  • Asian Legal Resource Center, Hong Kong (holding general consultative status with the Economic and Social Council, United Nations)
  • Indian American Muslim Council (Between 2012 – 2015)

South Asia Civil Society Organizations:

  • Association of Parents of Disappeared Persons, Jammu & Kashmir
  • Citizen’s for Justice and Peace, Mumbai
  • Khalra Mission Organization, Punjab (Between 2013-2015)
  • Manipur Women Gun Survivors Network (Between 2012-2013)
  • Prashant: Center for Human Rights, Justice, and Peace, Gujarat (Between 2013-2015)

ADVISORY GROUP

  • Roxanna Altholz, Assistant Clinical Professor of Law & Associate Director, International Human Rights Law Clinic, School of Law, University of California, Berkeley
  • Betsy Apple, Advocacy Director, Open Society Justice Initiative, New York
  • Rajvinder Singh Bains, Counsel, Punjab High Court and Haryana High Court
  • Patrick Ball, Executive Director, Human Rights Data Analysis Group, San Francisco
  • Elazar Barkan, Professor of International and Public Affairs, Director of SIPA’s Human Rights Concentration & Director of the Institute for the Study of Human Rights, Columbia University
  • Homi K. Bhabha, Anne F. Rothenberg Professor of the Humanities in the Department of English & Director of the Humanities Center, Harvard University
  • Jacqueline Bhabha, Professor of the Practice of Health and Human Rights, School of Public Health & Director of Research, François-Xavier Bagnoud Center for Health and Human Rights, Harvard University
  • Akeel Bilgrami, Sidney Morgenbesser Professor of Philosophy and Professor, Committee on Global Thought, Columbia University
  • Wendy Brown, Class of 1936 First Professor of Political Science, University of California, Berkeley
  • Shashi Buluswar, Development and Human Rights Specialist and Founding Co-chair, Armed Conflict Resolution and People’s Rights Project, Center for Social Sector Leadership, Haas School of Business, University of California, Berkeley, from 2012-2015
  • Urvashi Butalia, Author,Co-founder of Kali for Women, and Director of Zubaan, Delhi
  • Judith Butler, Maxine Elliot Professor in the Departments of Rhetoric and Comparative Literature & Co-director of the Program of Critical Theory, University of California, Berkeley
  • Richard M. Buxbaum, Jackson H. Ralston Professor Emeritus of International Law, School of Law, University of California, Berkeley
  • Andrik Cardenas, Former Associate Director, Center for Social Sector Leadership, Haas School of Business, University of California, Berkeley
  • Partha Chatterjee, Professor of Anthropology and of Middle Eastern, South Asian and African Studies, Columbia University
  • Charlie Clements, Faculty, Harvard Humanitarian Initiativeand Former Executive Director (2009-2015), Carr Center for Human Rights Policy, Kennedy School, Harvard University
  • David Cohen, Director, WSD Handa Center for Human Rights and International Justice at Stanford Global Studies, Stanford University, & Visiting Professor in the Graduate School, University of California, Berkeley; and Professor, William S. Richardson School of Law, University of Hawai`i
  • Veena Das, Krieger-Eisenhower Professor, Department of Anthropology, Johns Hopkins University
  • Malathi de Alwis, Visiting Professor, Faculty of Graduate Studies, University of Colombo
  • Mihir Desai, Senior Counsel, Mumbai High Court and Supreme Court of India
  • Laurel Fletcher, Clinical Professor of Law & Director of the International Human Rights Law Clinic, School of Law, University of California, Berkeley
  • Bijo Francis, Executive Director, Asia Legal Resource Center, Hong Kong
  • Meenakshi Ganguly, South Asia Director, Human Rights Watch
  • Pamela M. Graham, Director, Center for Human Rights Documentation & Research and Director of Global Studies, Lehman Social Sciences Library, Columbia University
  • Sam Gregory, Program Director, WITNESS, New York
  • Inderpal Grewal, Professor, Women’s, Gender & Sexuality Studies, Yale University
  • Thomas Bolm Hansen, Reliance-Dhirubhai Ambani Professor in South Asian Studies, Professor in Anthropology, and Director of Center for South Asia, Stanford University
  • Parvez Imroz, Counsel, Jammu & Kashmir High Court and President, Jammu & Kashmir Coalition of Civil Society, Srinagar
  • Abdul R. JanMohamed, Professor, Department of English, University of California, Berkeley
  • Isfundiar Kasuri, Program Director, Justice Project Pakistan
  • Mallika Kaur, Human Rights and Gender Specialist and Director of Programs, Armed Conflict Resolution and People’s Rights Project, Center for Social Sector Leadership, Haas School of Business, University of California, Berkeley, from 2012-2015
  • Amitava Kumar, Helen D. Lockwood Professor of English, Vassar College
  • Vinay Lal, Associate Professor of History, University of California, Los Angeles
  • Harsh Mander, Director, Center for Equity Studies, Delhi
  • Jaykumar Menon, Legal Expert and Professor of Practice, McGill University
  • Ritu Menon, Writer, Co-founder of Kali for Women​, and Publisher of Women Unlimited, Delhi​
  • Chandra Talpade Mohanty, Professor of Women’s and Gender Studies, Sociology, and the Cultural Foundations of Education & Dean’s Professor of the Humanities, Syracuse University
  • Binalakshmi Nepram, Founder, Manipur Women Gun Survivors Network, Delhi and Manipur
  • Khurram Parvez, Program Coordinator, Jammu & Kashmir Coalition of Civil Society, Srinagar
  • Sudhir Pattnaik, Civil Society Leader and Editor of Samadrusti, a human rights news magazine, Bhubaneswar
  • C. Ryan Perkins, South Asian Studies Librarian, Stanford University
  • Jyoti Puri, Professor of Sociology, Simmons College
  • Paul Rabinow, Professor of Anthropology, University of California, Berkeley
  • Laura Ring, Cataloger and Southern Asia Librarian, University of Chicago
  • Kathy Roberts, Legal Director, Center for Justice and Accountability
  • Naomi Roht-Arriaza, Distinguished Professor of Law, University of California, Hastings College of the Law
  • Richard Rudd, Sutter East Bay Medical Foundation, Berkeley
  • Jeremy Sarkin, Professor of Law, University of South Africa and Distinguished Visiting Professor, Nova University Law School, Lisbon, Portugal & Former Chairperson of the United Nations Working Group on Enforced or Involuntary Disappearances
  • Stefan Schmitt, Director, International Forensic Program, Physicians for Human Rights
  • Kim Thuy Seelinger, Director, Sexual Violence Program, Human Rights Center, School of Law, University of California, Berkeley
  • Shuddhabrata Sengupta, Artist, Curator, Raqs Media Collective, New Delhi
  • Teesta Setalvad, Secretary, Citizens for Justice and Peace, Mumbai
  • Dina Siddiqi, Professor, Anthropology Collective and Economics and Social Sciences Department, BRAC University, Dhaka
  • Nora Silver, Faculty Director, Center for Social Sector Leadership, Haas School of Business, University of California, Berkeley
  • Khatharya Um, Associate Professor and Coordinator, Asian American and Asian Diaspora Studies, Chair, Peace and Conflict Studies & Faculty Academic Director, Berkeley Study Abroad, University of California, Berkeley